Managing Your Health


Smoking Cessation
Posted November 19, 2018

Smoking Cessation

Tobacco use is the leading cause of illness and death in the US, responsible for more than 430,000 deaths in the US each year. Smoking is known to cause of cancer, stroke, heart disease, lung disease and complications with pregnancy. No matter how old you are, it is never too late to stop smoking.

Here are some Benefits of Quitting

As soon as you quit, your body begins to repair the damage caused by smoking. See the health benefits you’ll experience as soon as 20 minutes to 15 years after quitting.

20 Minutes After Quitting:
  • Your heart rate drops to a normal level.
12 Hours After Quitting:
  • The carbon monoxide level in your blood drops to normal.
2 Weeks to 3 Months After Quitting:
  • Your risk of having a heart attack begins to drop.
  • Your lung function begins to improve.
1 to 9 Months After Quitting:
  • Your coughing and shortness of breath decrease.
1 Year After Quitting:
  • Your added risk of coronary heart disease is half that of a smoker’s.
5 to 15 Years After Quitting:
  • Your risk of having a stroke is reduced to that of a nonsmoker’s.
  • Your risk of getting cancer of the mouth, throat, or esophagus is half that of a smoker’s.
10 Years After Quitting:
  • Your risk of dying from lung cancer is about half that of a smoker’s.
  • Your risk of getting bladder cancer is half that of a smoker’s.
  • Your risk of getting cervical cancer or cancer of the larynx, kidney or pancreas decreases.
15 Years After Quitting:
  • Your risk of coronary heart disease is the same as that of a nonsmoker.

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human

Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2004.

Get Help Quitting!

  • Schedule an appointment with your doctor to find out the best way for to quit smoking
  • Find a local quitline. Call 1-800-QUIT-NOW to connect directly to your state’s quitline. l 1–800–QUIT–NOW (1–800–784–8669).
  • Use the National Cancer Institute’s quitline. Call 1-877-44U-QUIT to talk with an expert for free
  • Try SmokefreeTXT. Sign up to get 24/7 support sent right to your phone. A mobile text messaging service designed for adults and young adults across the United States who are trying to quit smoking. Or Use an app. The Quit Guide app allows you to track cravings and slips by time of day and location, and has many other features to help you become smokefree.

Content provided and maintained by Smokefree.gov and the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2004.